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Old 05-18-2015, 10:11 AM
Charles Kenyon Charles Kenyon is offline Windows 8 Office 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Madanjeet View Post
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So: some formatting options are there in the Modify Styles dialog; some are there on the ribbon...each in their own silo. And never the twain shall meet. ***
Something like that. The Case switches on the toolbar (and for that matter using Shift+F3) are not formatting, as such. They change the actual letters rather than an attribute applied to such letters.

If you have an All Caps setting in a Style and apply it to a mixed case sentence, it does not change the actual underlying characters. If you change to a different style without that setting, the case will revert to what it was as typed. This shows up in Tables of Contents based on heading styles with an all caps setting. When the heading was originally typed, the typist may not have paid any attention to capitalization, because of the style setting. However, what was originally typed shows up in the TOC.

It is not that some are on the ribbon and some are in the Modify Styles dialog.

It is similar with the highlighting which is available on the ribbon but does not show up as a type of formatting that can be applied using vba or a Style.

Essentially if it is in the paragraph formatting, font formatting, or tabs setting dialogs, it can be a part of a style.
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